NEWS

SOURCE: SCIENCE DAILY
Here is an RSS feed from Science Daily’s Space and Time section to keep you up to date on current events in the space community.
  • Hubble finds that Betelgeuse's mysterious dimming is due to a traumatic outburst

    Observations are showing that the unexpected dimming of the supergiant star Betelgeuse was most likely caused by an immense amount of hot material ejected into space, forming a dust cloud that blocked starlight coming from Betelgeuse's surface.
  • How stars form in the smallest galaxies

    The question of how small, dwarf galaxies have sustained the formation of new stars over the course of the Universe has long confounded the world's astronomers. An international research team has found that dormant small galaxies can slowly accumulate gas over many billions of years. When this gas suddenly collapses under its own weight, new stars are able to arise.
  • Perovskite and organic solar cells rocketed into space

    Researchers have sent perovskite and organic solar cells on a rocket into space. The solar cells withstood the extreme conditions in space, producing power from direct sunlight and reflective light from the Earth's surface. The work sets the foundation for future near-Earth application as well as potential deep space missions.
  • Extremely young galaxy is Milky Way look-alike

    Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have revealed an extremely distant and therefore very young galaxy that looks surprisingly like our Milky Way. The galaxy is so far away its light has taken more than 12 billion years to reach us: we see it as it was when the Universe was just 1.4 billion years old. It is also surprisingly unchaotic, contradicting theories that all galaxies in the early Universe were turbulent and unstable.
  • 'Black dwarf supernova': Physicist calculates when the last supernova ever will happen

    New theoretical research finds that many white dwarfs may explode in supernova in the distant far future, long after everything else in the universe has died and gone quiet.
  • Mystery solved: Bright areas on Ceres come from salty water below

    Data from NASA's recent Dawn mission answers two long-unresolved questions: Is there liquid inside Ceres, and how long ago was the dwarf planet geologically active?
  • Classifying galaxies with artificial intelligence

    Astronomers have applied artificial intelligence (AI) to ultra-wide field-of-view images of the distant Universe captured by the Subaru Telescope, and have achieved a very high accuracy for finding and classifying spiral galaxies in those images. This technique, in combination with citizen science, is expected to yield further discoveries in the future.
  • New method to determine the origin of stardust in meteorites

    Scientists have made a key discovery thanks to stardust found in meteorites, shedding light on the origin of crucial chemical elements.
  • NASA's planet Hunter completes its primary mission

    NASA's TESS has completed its primary mission, imaging about 75% of the starry sky during a two-year-long survey. TESS has found 66 new planets, nearly 2,100 candidates, and much more.
  • Explosive nuclear astrophysics

    An international team has made a key discovery related to 'presolar grains' found in some meteorites. This discovery has shed light on stellar explosions and the origin of chemical elements. It has also provided a new method for astronomical research.
  • Huge ring-like structure on Ganymede's surface may have been caused by violent impact

    Image data reanalysis has revealed that ancient tectonic troughs are concentrically distributed across almost the entire surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede. Computer simulation results suggest that this giant crater could have resulted from the impact of an asteroid with a 150-kilometer radius. If so, this the largest impact structure identified in the solar system so far.
  • Stellar egg hunt with ALMA

    Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) took a census of stellar eggs in the constellation Taurus and revealed their evolution state. This census helps researchers understand how and when a stellar embryo transforms to a baby star deep inside a gaseous egg. In addition, the team found a bipolar outflow, a pair of gas streams, that could be telltale evidence of a truly newborn star.
  • NASA's Maven observes Martian night sky pulsing in ultraviolet light

    Vast areas of the Martian night sky pulse in ultraviolet light, according to images from NASA's MAVEN spacecraft. The results are being used to illuminate complex circulation patterns in the Martian atmosphere
  • Hubble uses Earth as proxy for identifying oxygen on potentially habitable exoplanets

    Taking advantage of a total lunar eclipse, Hubble used the Moon as a mirror to study sunlight that had passed through Earth's atmosphere. As a result, Hubble detected Earth's own brand of sunscreen - ozone - in our atmosphere. The technique simulates how scientists will search for evidence of life on planets around other stars.
  • Researchers use InSight for deep Mars measurements

    Using data from NASA's InSight Lander on Mars, seismologists have made the first direct measurements of three subsurface boundaries from the crust to the core of the red planet.
  • Ammonia sparks unexpected, exotic lightning on Jupiter

    NASA's Juno spacecraft -- orbiting and closely observing the planet Jupiter -- has unexpectedly discovered lightning in the planet's upper atmosphere, according to a multi-institutional study.
  • Ammonia-rich hail sheds new light on Jupiter's weather

    New Juno results suggest that the violent thunderstorms taking place in Jupiter's atmosphere may form ammonia-rich hail, or 'mushballs', that play a key role in the planet's atmospheric dynamics.
  • Sun’s bubble of influence may be shaped like a deflated croissant

    Scientists have developed a new prediction of the shape of the bubble surrounding our solar system using a model developed with data from NASA missions.
  • Lava tubes on Mars and the Moon are so wide they can host planetary bases

    Subsurface cavities created by lava on Mars and the Moon could provide a shield against cosmic radiation, new research suggests.
  • Calcium-rich supernova examined with x-rays for first time

    X-ray images give unprecedented view of extremely rare type of supernova. New information suggests that these supernovae start as compact stars that lose mass at the end of life. Calcium-rich supernovae are responsible for up to half the calcium in the entire universe. SN 2019ehk has the richest calcium emission of all known transients.
  • Scientists discover new penguin colonies from space

    A new study using satellite mapping technology reveals there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than was previously thought. The results provide an important benchmark for monitoring the impact of environmental change on the population of this iconic bird.
  • Surprisingly dense exoplanet challenges planet formation theories

    New detailed observations reveal a young exoplanet, orbiting a young star in the Hyades cluster, that is unusually dense for its size and age. Weighing in at 25 Earth-masses, and slightly smaller than Neptune, this exoplanet's existence is at odds with the predictions of leading planet formation theories.
  • Planet found orbiting small, cool star

    Precision measurements made with the VLBA have revealed that a small, cool star 35 light-years from Earth is orbited by a Saturn-sized planet once every 221 days.
  • The quiet Sun is much more active than we thought

    For a long time, researchers have believed that there is not much of interest going on in the Sun during the passive period, therefore not worth studying. Now this assumption is showed to be false. This is the first time that astronomers are systematically studying the phenomena of the solar minimum.
  • Unequal neutron-star mergers create unique 'bang' in simulations

    In a series of simulations, researchers determined that some neutron star collisions not only produce gravitational waves, but also electromagnetic radiation that should be detectable on Earth.